University vs. College- A college is made up of different degree programs in one area of study. A university is made up of different colleges with different areas of study. For example, within the University of Hawaii at Manoa, there is the Shidler College of Business.

UNDERGRADUATE– An undergraduate student is working towards a bachelor’s or associate degree.

CO-REQUISITE- A co-requisite refers to a requirement where you must take one class in the same semester as another class. For example, if you are a biology student, you may have to take a biology lecture class in the same semester as a biology lab class.

CREDIT HOUR- This refers to how many hours a week you will spend in class. For example, if you take a 3-credit class, then you will be in that class about 3 hour a week.

CO-CURRICULAR- A co-curricular refers to an activity that isn’t required to graduate. For example, while you are in college you might join the Debate club.

GRADUATE STUDENT- A graduate student is working towards a degree higher than a bachelor’s or associate degree such as a master’s degree or doctoral degree.

SAR- Student Aid Report. After you apply for the FAFSA, you will be sent a SAR which summarizes your answers. It will also include your Expected Family Contribution (EFC). EFC refers to how much your family may be expected to pay for your college expenses.

FAFSA- Free Application for Federal Student Aid. This is an annual application for financial aid for college. Different universities have different priority deadlines for FAFSA. For example, the FAFSA priority deadline for Hawaii Pacific University is March 1st. For the University of Hawaii, it’s February 1st.

RESIDENT STUDENT– a college student that is a resident of the state that they are going to college in  ( like a Hawaii resident).

College Acceptance Rate- the percentage of applicants that are accepted into the college. A low acceptance rate may mean that the application pool is competitive.

College retention rate- the percentage of students who stay in college after they have applied. A high retention rate usually indicates a more successful college.

WAITLIST- when colleges do not offer you admission but tell you that you might get a spot in the future if spots become available.

IN STATE TUITION- Resident students pay in-state tuition, which is generally cheaper than out-of-state tuition.

OUT OF STATE TUITION- non-resident students pay out-of-state tuition, which is generally more expensive than in-state tuition.

NON RESIDENT STUDENT– a college student that is not a resident of the state where they are going to school (like a California resident that is going to college in Hawaii).

NON RESIDENT STUDENT– a college student that is not a resident of the state where they are going to school (like a California resident that is going to college in Hawaii).

MAJOR- A major is a specific academic concentration that students focus on. For example, if you want to be an author, you might choose to be an English major in college.

MINOR- A minor is a secondary academic concentration that will often complement a student’s major. For example, if your career goal is to be an anime creator in Japan, you might major in graphic design and minor in Japanese language to help you achieve that goal.

University vs. Community College- There are several differences between a university and a community college. Universities often offer far more degrees such as bachelor’s and graduate degrees. Community colleges offer associate degrees, and some may offer select bachelor’s degrees. Universities are often much larger and more expensive than Community Colleges. Many other differences may exist, so make sure to research the college you are applying for to see what is right for you!

Check out this glossary for even more useful terms: GLOSSARY